There are two great classes of sentences according to the general principles upon which they are founded. These are termed the loose and the periodic. In the loose sentence the main idea is put first, and then follow several facts in connect... Read more of SENTENCE CLASSIFICATION at Speaking Writing.comInformational Site Network Informational
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Applications Of The Joint








is a sketch of a portion of a sideboard top, showing the plough groove ready worked out to receive the tongue; the other half of the top is treated in a similar manner. It will be noticed that the groove is not worked through the full length of the board, but stopped about 11⁄4 in. from each end; this leaves a square joint at each end of the top on which the moulding is worked. If the groove be run through the board it looks very unsightly when the mould is finished.


is a shaped spandrel, such as is fixed in the recess of a sideboard or cupboard or shop window fitment. It is of such a width that, were it cut from a wide board, the shaped portion would be apt to break off owing to the short grain at C. The shaping is therefore built up out of three separate pieces, the grain running as indicated. The loose tongue is represented by the dotted line and a section is shown of the joint at the line A B. At the opposite corner the tongue is left blind, i.e., not run through the edge. This is the method that should be used when the shaping is above the level of the eye.


Fig. 106.—Part of Sideboard Top; grooved  with ends left blind. (The boards are  shown upright.) Fig. 106.—Part of Sideboard Top; grooved with ends left blind. (The boards are shown upright.)

Fig. 107.—Shaped Spandrel for Recess. Fig. 107.—Shaped Spandrel for Recess.

shows part of a carcase of a dressing table. The drawer runner A is shown grooved across the end to receive a cross tongue; this cross tongue engages a similar groove in the front bearer. This method of fastening the runner to the bearer is in everyday use.


Fig. 108.—Part Carcase of Dressing Table. Fig. 108.—Part Carcase of Dressing Table.

Fig. 109.—Framed Writing Table Top. Fig. 109.—Framed Writing Table Top.

is a writing table top. The centre boards are first jointed and glued up, after which the ends and sides are grooved ready to receive the cross tongues. The hardwood margins are shown at one end and at the front, and the grooves are arranged so that, on completion, the marginal frame stands above the top just the amount of the thickness of the leather which will cover the table. In some cases the margin at the end runs the same way of the grain as the top, thus allowing for slight shrinkage. Cross tongues would of course be used in this case.


is a sketch showing one-quarter of a barred or tracery cabinet door. An enlarged section of the astragal mould which is grooved to fit on the bar which forms the rebate is also shown.


is a "Combing or corner locking" joint, a method of making boxes by means of a continuous use of tongues and grooves instead of dovetails. This type of joint is generally machine made. The amateur, however, who is not proficient to undertake a dovetailed box frequently uses this method.










Fig. 110.—Corner      of Barred Door.

Fig. 110.—Corner of Barred Door.

Fig. 111.—Combing or      Locking Joint.

Fig. 111.—Combing or Locking Joint.

Fig. 112.—Single      Loose      Tongue and      Double-tongue      Joint.

Fig. 112.—Single Loose Tongue and Double-tongue Joint.







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