The Litchfield, Captain Barton, left Ireland on the 11th of November, 1758, in company with several other men of war and transports, under the command of Commodore Keppel, intended for the reduction of Goree. The voyage was prosperous till th... Read more of Loss Of His Majesty's Ship Litchfield at Sea Stories.caInformational Site Network Informational
Privacy
     
Home - Carpentry - Woodworking - Wood Turning - Wood Handwork - Making Furniture

Dovetail Grooving








The dovetail housing joint should first be carefully marked out with a marking knife, so as to cut across the fibres of the wood. For obtaining the bevel on the edge of the wood a joiner's bevel may be used, and the angle should not be too acute. (See previous chapter.) Take a chisel and pare away a small channel as at A, , to form a small shoulder to guide the saw.


Fig. 315.—Paring away Channel for Dovetail Grooving. Fig. 315.—Paring away Channel for Dovetail Grooving.

With a fine tenon or dovetail saw, cut the saw kerf as at . If any difficulty is experienced in cutting the kerf true and square, you may resort to the method shown at C, ; a small temporary piece of timber has been screwed on the top of the work to form a guide for the saw.









Fig. 316.—Cutting the Saw Kerf.

Fig. 316.—Cutting the Saw Kerf.

Fig. 317.—Old Woman's      Tooth Plane.

Fig. 317.—Old Woman's Tooth Plane.


Fig. 318.—Guide Block for Bevelling. Fig. 318.—Guide Block for Bevelling.

, B, shows the small channel formed by the chisel prior to the sawing operation. The sawing of the bevelled side is worked in a similar manner; but occasionally we find amateurs who adopt the method shown at . A block of wood (H) is first made by boring a 11⁄4-in. hole through its entire length, and afterwards making a saw cut at the desired bevel. The object of this block, which is kept specially for the purpose, is to form a guide for those who have not full control of the dovetail saw; the back of the saw clears the hole, and the required bevel is obtained. When a saw cut has been made at each side of the groove, the surplus timber is pared away in the following manner: Cut away portion E, ; then cut away portion F, and lastly cut away the apex portion marked G. Continue by this method of paring until the approximate depth is reached. To ensure a correct depth throughout the entire groove, the router plane (or, as it is often called, "the old woman's tooth plane," ) is used.


Fig. 319.—Showing Method of Paring. Fig. 319.—Showing Method of Paring.

Fig. 320.—Channelling the Alternate Piece. Fig. 320.—Channelling the Alternate Piece.

With regard to cutting the alternate piece, it is necessary to first plane the end of the shelf true and square. With a cutting gauge strike the line K, ; the required bevel on the edge (J) is then set out, and with the chisel a small channel is again formed. With the tenon or dovetail saw cut down the line K to the required depth, and carefully pare away the wood with a sharp chisel to the correct shape.









Next: The Mitred Joint

Previous: Machine-made Dovetails



Add to del.icio.us Add to Reddit Add to Digg Add to Del.icio.us Add to Google Add to Twitter Add to Stumble Upon
Add to Informational Site Network
Report
Privacy
SHAREADD TO EBOOK


Viewed 1356