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Inside Hingeing








When a door is being hung inside the carcase (that is, not hinged over the ends) it is permissible, in the case of light work, to let the whole thickness of the hinge into the door; and when screwing the door to the carcase it is usual to fix the knuckle of the hinge flush with the face of the carcase, thus allowing the door frame to stand back, making a break of about 1⁄8 in. with the face. The marking gauge should be set to the full width of the hinge; the mark, gauged on the inside of the carcase end, thus forms a line to guide the worker whilst fixing the door. To successfully fix a door it generally requires two persons, one to hold the door in position, whilst the other bores the holes and fixes the screws.


Fig. 239.—Showing Top and Bottom of Carcase Cut  Back to allow Door to Close. Fig. 239.—Showing Top and Bottom of Carcase Cut Back to allow Door to Close.








Fig. 240.—Outside Hingeing.

Fig. 240.—Outside Hingeing.

Fig. 241.—Section.

Fig. 241.—Section.


shows the correct method of fitting butt hinges on high-class work. One wing of the hinge is let into the door, and the other wing is let into the carcase or door jamb, thus distributing a proportion of the weight to the carcase end instead of allowing the whole of the weight to be carried by the screws as would be the case in a, . The method of sinking each portion of the hinge into the door and carcase respectively is costly; hence it is not the general practice in cheap work. In the top and bottom of carcase (T and B) are shown set back to allow the door to close.







Next: Outside Hingeing

Previous: Acute Angle Hingeing



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