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Joints For Curved Work








shows a circular frame made up in two thicknesses, the segments being screwed to each other and the joints crossed in two layers. This is a very strong method, and it is used for making circular frames and curbs up to 15 ft. in diameter. The segments can be either long or short, the only important condition being that they must be marked out and sawn to the correct radius. shows a board marked out in segments for this class of work. The longer the boards the better will they cut up, as it gives more opportunities of cutting one piece out of the other as at A A.









Fig. 335.—Circular Frame      in Two Thicknesses.

Fig. 335.—Circular Frame in Two Thicknesses.

Fig. 336.—Circular Rim      in Halved Segments.

Fig. 336.—Circular Rim in Halved Segments.


shows how to begin to put the work together. To continue this, fit other segments in position and screw them to D and E respectively. The completed work is illustrated at .









Fig. 337.—Board Marked for      Circular Jointing.

Fig. 337.—Board Marked for Circular Jointing.

Fig. 338.—Putting Circular      Work Together.

Fig. 338.—Putting Circular Work Together.









Fig. 339.

Fig. 339.

Fig. 340.

Fig. 340.


Method of Building up Semicircular Head of Door Frame.


shows a circular rim, or curb, made of segments which are halved together. This method is suitable for heavy work, where the timbers are of considerable size. The halvings are cut on the ends of the segments to any convenient shape or bevel, each one being marked so as to fit its fellow.


Fig. 341.—Part of Laminated Table Frame. Fig. 341.—Part of Laminated Table Frame.

Fig. 342.—Half of Laminated Core Box. Fig. 342.—Half of Laminated Core Box.

When extra length is required, semicircular or circular work is built up out of four or five thicknesses of wood, and the method is called laminating. The method of building up the semicircular head of a door frame by this method is shown at .


The shaped framing for kidney-shaped writing tables and similar classes of work is built up by laminating pieces of 3⁄4-in. or 1-in. wood, after which the face side is veneered so as to hide the glued joints. shows a sketch of one quarter of an elliptical table frame levelled up and ready for applying the veneer.







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Previous: Mitreing A Moulded Door Frame



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