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Notched Joints








is a "notched joint," where two joists, or scantlings, cross each other, the object of the joint being to prevent the joists moving from their position without materially weakening them. For an end notch, see .


Fig. 349.—  Method of  Building up  Turnings. Fig. 349.— Method of Building up Turnings.








Fig. 350.—Notched Joint.

Fig. 350.—Notched Joint.

Fig. 351.—The Saddle Joint.

Fig. 351.—The Saddle Joint.


The "saddle joint" is used for connecting upright posts to heads or sills of framing, and undoubtedly takes its name from its similarity to the way in which the saddle fits the horse. It does not weaken the framing as does a mortise and tenon joint, and shrinkage has little effect upon the joint. The "cogged joint," used for connecting purlins to rafter and joists to girders, is illustrated in .









Fig. 352.—End Notch.

Fig. 352.—End Notch.

Fig. 353.—Cogged Joint.

Fig. 353.—Cogged Joint.









Fig. 354.—Birdsmouth      Joint.

Fig. 354.—Birdsmouth Joint.

Fig. 355.—Another type      of Birdsmouth Joint.

Fig. 355.—Another type of Birdsmouth Joint.







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