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Planing








After sawing the piece to approximately the correct angle, it is necessary on high-class work to plane the cut end so as to give a perfect finish and enable a glued joint to be made. This may be accomplished by using the plane on the shooting board, as shown at , and, if the worker is constantly using mitres of various angles, it is an easy matter to make new angle blocks and fix them on to the board. Other workers prefer the screw mitre trap shown at . This apparatus takes wide plinth or cornice moulds, and the angle may be altered by fitting temporary packing pieces under the work so as to tilt the moulding to the desired angle. The method of using the plane is indicated in the illustration.


Another method in everyday use by those workers who are constantly mitreing wide pieces of stock at 45 degrees is the "donkey's ear" shooting board illustrated at . The plane is laid on its side on the surface of the board marked A, and used in a similar manner to that shown at .


Fig. 325.—Use of Plane and Shooting Board for Mitreing. Fig. 325.—Use of Plane and Shooting Board for Mitreing.

Fig. 326.—The Screw Mitre Trap. Fig. 326.—The Screw Mitre Trap.

A simple method and one that should always be remembered because it is handy when working without a shooting board is shown at . Set the marking or cutting gauge to the thickness of the wood to be mitred at 45 degrees; then gauge this distance on the wood, as shown at B; draw from the line to the edge, as shown, and saw and plane to a finish. The diagonals of a square give 45 degrees, and this is the method used to mark out the work. The end of the wood must, of course, be square with its edges before marking out in this manner.


Fig. 327.—'Donkey's Ear' Shooting Board. Fig. 327.—"Donkey's Ear" Shooting Board.









Fig. 328.—Gauging      for Mitres.

Fig. 328.—Gauging for Mitres.

Fig. 329.—Narrow      Inner Moulding.

Fig. 329.—Narrow Inner Moulding.

Fig. 330.—Wide      Mitred Moulding.

Fig. 330.—Wide Mitred Moulding.


shows a bevelled framing into which has been mitred a narrow moulding M so as to show a correct margin around the panel.


Fig. 331.—Door with Curved Mitres. Fig. 331.—Door with Curved Mitres.

Fig. 332.—Method of Setting out for a Curved Mitre. Fig. 332.—Method of Setting out for a Curved Mitre.


shows a similar framing, but with a wide moulding M mitred around it. To obtain a correct intersection of this moulding, the angles A and B are bisected. The bisection of the angles meets before the width of the moulding is cleared, therefore the angle C will again have to be bisected, and the finished joint will appear as shown. One of the simplest of mouldings with a large flat face has been chosen to illustrate this. The moulding could be all in one width, as shown, or it could be built into the framing in separate pieces, the wide flat and the piece carrying the mould.







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Previous: Sawing Block



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