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The Bridle Joint








A bridle joint is often defined as the reverse of a mortise and tenon, and is chiefly used in the carpentry and joinery trades. The name probably originated from the fact that it bears some resemblance to the manner in which a bit slips into the horse's mouth and is fastened to the bridle. There are fewer varieties of the bridle joint than of the halved or the mortise and tenon; and this being the case we may take the opportunity of giving a few detailed directions, with explanatory illustrations, on the setting out and the making.


Fig. 72.—Simple Bridle Joint. Fig. 72.—Simple Bridle Joint.

shows a bridle joint in what is perhaps its simplest form, the separate pieces being given at the left and the completed joint at the right. A joint of this type may be applied in nearly all cases where a halved or a mortise and tenon joint could be used. Bridle joints have an advantage as regards appearance over the mortise and tenoned variety in cases such as , which shows an occasional table leg fitted to the circular top framing. The bridle joint here allows the grain of the leg to run through to the top, and gives a better and more workmanlike appearance to the completed article.


Fig. 73.—Table Leg Bridle-jointed to Rail. Fig. 73.—Table Leg Bridle-jointed to Rail.

is a "Mitred bridle joint," the part a showing the upright portion separated. This is a most useful joint for positions similar to that shown in the small glass frame, . The wood framing in this case is only 13⁄8 in. in width, and if a mortise were used it would have to be exceptionally small. The shaped rail at the bottom of this frame again shows the application of the bridle joint.


shows an "Oblique bridle joint," used in many instances as a brace, or strut, to prevent framing from racking. (See also .)


is a "Stopped bridle joint," used in positions where the top or bottom edge of the work meets the eye, and where, if the rail were allowed to run through, the end grain would appear unsightly.









Fig. 74.—Mitre      Bridle Joint.

Fig. 74.—Mitre Bridle Joint.

Fig. 75.—Mirror Frame      with Bridle Joints.

Fig. 75.—Mirror Frame with Bridle Joints.


is a so-called bridle-joint at the corner of a frame. This is also called an "Open slot mortise and tenon joint," a good strong, serviceable joint which can be used instead of the closed mortise and tenon type, its advantage being that less labour is required in the making. (See also .)


is an "Oblique angle bridle joint," used in similar positions to the above, but when the two pieces meet at an acute angle at the end of a frame.


shows the application of the bridle joint to a roof truss. Two sketches are shown at the joining of the tie beam and the principal rafter. The joint a is the type generally used. (See also for the joints in a queen post roof.)









Fig. 76.—Oblique      Bridle Joint.

Fig. 76.—Oblique Bridle Joint.

Fig. 77.—Stopped Bridle      Joint.

Fig. 77.—Stopped Bridle Joint.









Fig. 78.—Bridle Joint      at Corner of Frame.

Fig. 78.—Bridle Joint at Corner of Frame.

Fig. 79.—Oblique Angle      Bridle Joint.

Fig. 79.—Oblique Angle Bridle Joint.


Fig. 80.—Application of Bridle Joint to Roof Truss. Fig. 80.—Application of Bridle Joint to Roof Truss.







Next: Setting Out And Marking

Previous: Joints Other Than A Right Angle



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