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Wedges








shows the method of cutting wedges which are to be used to wedge the tenons; this avoids waste of material. Some workers cut the wedges from the pieces left out of the haunching of the lock rail, or the bottom rail.









Fig. 136.—Cutting Wedges      from Waste of Haunching.

Fig. 136.—Cutting Wedges from Waste of Haunching.

Fig. 137.—Stile      and Cross Rail      with Horn.

Fig. 137.—Stile and Cross Rail with Horn.


A Stile and Cross Rail, framed together, are shown at . The portion above the rail is called the horn, and it is usual to leave sufficient length of stile to project above and below the cross rails, so that there will be no tendency for the stile to burst out at the end whilst the cramping and wedging of the frame is in progress. On completing the framing the horn is cut away.


In we have a type of joint frequently used for garden gates. The illustration shows the method of tenoning the three pieces to the top rail, barefaced tenons being employed.










Fig. 138.—Joint used for      Garden Gates.

Fig. 138.—Joint used for Garden Gates.

Fig. 139.—      Sprocket Wheel.

Fig. 139.— Sprocket Wheel.

Fig. 140.—      Boring Tool.

Fig. 140.— Boring Tool.







Next: Sprocket Wheel

Previous: Barefaced Tenons



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