Barefaced Tenons





illustrates the joint in its simplest form and shows a tenon having only one shoulder. This is called a barefaced tenon, and it will be noticed that the portion which carries the mortise is thicker than the rail on which the tenon is cut. The joint is therefore level (or flush as it is called) on one side only, and it should never be used at the corner of a frame. It is a useful interior joint for framing that has to be covered on the back side with matchboarding, and allows the work to finish level at the back when the boarding has been applied (see plan, ).



Stub or Stump Tenon (; also occasionally called a joggle tenon).—The illustration shows a tenon as used in the interior of a frame. The tenon is not allowed to run through the stile, and unslightliness on the edge is thus avoided. This type of tenon is often used at the corner of a frame, and it then requires to be haunched. A good workshop method of gauging the depth of the mortise for a stub tenon is shown in ; a piece of gummed stamp paper is stuck on the side of the mortise chisel, indicating the desired depth of the mortise. This greatly facilitates the work, as it is not necessary to be constantly measuring.



A Haunched Tenon as used at the end of a door frame is shown at .—In this case it will be seen that the width of the tenon is reduced, so that sufficient timber will be left at the end of the stile to resist the pressure of the tenon when the joint is driven together. The short portion (A) which is left on the tenon is called the haunch, and the cavity it engages is termed the haunching. The haunch and haunching prevent the two pieces of timber lipping, or becoming uneven on the face side, as would be the result if it were cut away entirely up to the shoulder.



shows the type of tenon and haunch used when the stile or upright rail is grooved to receive a panel. In this and similar cases the haunch is made the same width and the same depth as the groove; the groove therefore acts as the haunching. An application of this joint is shown in the top rail of the door frame, .



This type of joint is also used to connect the rail to the leg of an ordinary kitchen table .



Fig. 129.—Method  of Gauging for  depth of Tenon. Fig. 129.—Method of Gauging for depth of Tenon.
















Fig. 130.—Haunched Tenon      used at end of Door Frame.

Fig. 130.—Haunched Tenon used at end of Door Frame.

Fig. 131.—Haunched Tenon      used when Stile is Grooved      for Panel.

Fig. 131.—Haunched Tenon used when Stile is Grooved for Panel.

















Fig. 132.—Application of Haunched      Tenon Joint to Door Frame.

Fig. 132.—Application of Haunched Tenon Joint to Door Frame.

Fig. 133.—Occasional      Stump Tenon.

Fig. 133.—Occasional Stump Tenon.



is a variation of the stump tenon, occasionally used where the work in hand demands a thin tenon and a stout stump to take heavy strains.

















Fig. 134.—Joint for Inside      Framing.

Fig. 134.—Joint for Inside Framing.

Fig. 135.—Haunched      Barefaced Tenon.

Fig. 135.—Haunched Barefaced Tenon.



A joint used for inside framing is seen at . The rails may be used as shown, but in the case of a door frame (as ) they would have the inside edges grooved to receive the panels; the tenons would therefore be slightly narrower than shown, owing to the groove at each edge.



A Haunched Barefaced Tenon, used in similar positions to , is shown at . The door or frame in this case would be made of matchboarding nailed on the back as shown in the plan at .







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