Top Rails





At is shown the method of joining the top rails to the post of a tool shed or similar outhouse. The two rails, which are at right angles to each other, are half-lapped and mortised; the tenon on the post runs entirely through them.



A Tusk Tenon Joint, with wedge, as used to secure the binder to the girder when making floors, is indicated at . The tenon here is narrow and engages the mortise, which is situated in the compressional fibres immediately adjoining the neutral layer. shows a tusk tenon furnished with a drawbore pin.



Fig. 152.—Tusk Tenon. Fig. 152.—Tusk Tenon.


Fig. 153.—Wedged Tusk Tenon. Fig. 153.—Wedged Tusk Tenon.


is a variation of .



shows tusk and wedged tenons as used when making a portable book or medicine cabinet. The shelf is housed into the end, and the tenons run through the end and are secured by wedges. This allows the article to be quickly and easily taken to pieces for removal or re-polishing. The dotted line in indicates that the shelf may be shaped if desired.

















Fig. 154.—Another Type  of Tusk Tenon.

Fig. 154.—Another Type of Tusk Tenon.

Fig. 155.—Tusk Tenon  and Wedge.

Fig. 155.—Tusk Tenon and Wedge.



Fig. 156.—Wheelwright's Self-wedging Tenon Joint. Fig. 156.—Wheelwright's Self-wedging Tenon Joint.


In a self-wedging mortise and tenon joint used by wheelwrights is shown. The dotted line (left-hand diagram) will indicate the amount of taper given to the mortise.







Tongueing Planes Twin Tenons facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Feedback