Some of the most useful dyes and the least known are to be found among the Lichens. They seem to have been used among peasant dyers from remote ages, but apparently none of the great French dyers used them, nor are they mentioned in any of... Read more of The Lichen Dyes at Dyeing.caInformational Site Network Informational
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Cabinet-work Joints








With regard to tongued and grooved joints which apply more particularly to the jointing of cabinet work, is produced by planes which are specially made for the purpose. One plane makes the tongue and another the groove. The handiest sizes to buy are those which joint 3⁄8 in., 5⁄8 in., and 3⁄4 in. timber, it being usual to dowel or loose-tongue thicker boards. The 3⁄8 in. partitions (or, as they are sometimes called, dustboards) between the drawers of a sideboard or dressing chest are in good work jointed in this manner. The 5⁄8 in. and 3⁄4 in. ends and tops of pine or American whitewood dressing tables, wardrobes, etc., call for the larger sized plane.







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Previous: The Tongued And Grooved Joint



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