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Corner Joints








shows both a single loose tongue and a double solid tongue. Both are methods used to connect circular cornered work, such as a counter end, to the front framing.


indicates a tongued and grooved joint suitable for edge or end jointing, such as fitting matchboarding round a chimney breast, making small jewel drawers, etc.


is a tongued and grooved joint with a bead worked on same to hide the joint, sometimes called a staff-bead. It would be used in positions such as boarding around an upright iron pillar, etc., the bead giving a neat finish at each corner.


is a similar joint, but at an obtuse angle. An example of its use is in fixing boarding around an octagonal column of brickwork.










Fig. 113.

Fig. 113.

Fig. 114.

Fig. 114.

Fig. 115.

Fig. 115.


Examples of Tongued and Grooved Corner Joints.


shows a tongued and grooved mitre as used for strengthening the corners of cabinet work, such as tea caddies, small boxes, plinths, etc. Two pieces of wood are glued in position and allowed to set prior to glueing and cramping the joint proper. These pieces are afterwards planed away, thus leaving a clear surface to the box sides.


shows the method of working the groove in the above joints. The pieces are turned back to back, the mitres thus making a right angle. The guide on the grooving plane thus works against each face of the joint, and this ensures correct jointing.


is somewhat similar to , but with a quarter circle mould to hide the joint.


indicates the building up of a double skirting mould. C represents the brickwork, A the oak-framed panelling, and B the packing and fixing block. A wide skirting of this type is made in two portions for convenience in working the moulding and to prevent undue shrinkage.


Fig. 116.—Cramping a Tongued and Grooved Mitre. Fig. 116.—Cramping a Tongued and Grooved Mitre.








Fig. 117.—Working a Groove.

Fig. 117.—Working a Groove.

Fig. 118.—Corner      Joint with Corner      Mould.

Fig. 118.—Corner Joint with Corner Mould.


illustrates the use of a tongued and grooved joint for fixing together the sides of a corner bracket, and the same method holds good when jointing a corner cupboard. A capping mould or top shelf will conceal the joint; it then has the appearance of a glued butt joint, but is of course considerably stronger. No screws or nails are required if this joint be used.







Next: Ploughing

Previous: Applications Of The Joint



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