VIEW THE MOBILE VERSION of www.woodworkings.ca Informational Site Network Informational
Privacy
     
Home - Carpentry - Woodworking - Wood Turning - Wood Handwork - Making Furniture

Mitreing








The term mitreing is generally used to denote the type of joint used at the corner of a picture frame; or where two pieces of wood are bevelled away so as to fit each other, as the skirting or plinth mould at . In these cases the timber is cut so that the joint is at 45 degrees to the face, and the two pieces, when placed together, form an angle of 90 degrees (a right angle).


The term mitreing, however, is not confined to the fitting of timber around a right angle; it may be justly applied to the fitting of a moulding around an angle irrespective of the number of its degrees.


One often hears such terms as "a half mitre," used to denote the fitting of a moulding around an octagonal column or pedestal, and probably it would be more correct to describe the joint as a mitre cut at 221⁄2 degrees. Mitreing consists of halving the angle and making each piece to fit the line of bisection. Should the angle be bounded by straight lines, as at , then the mitred joint will be a straight line, but should the angle be bounded by a curved and a straight line, as at , A, or by two curved lines, then the mitred joint will have to be a curved line if the mouldings are to be of the same section.


Fig. 324.—Sawing Block for Mitreing. Fig. 324.—Sawing Block for Mitreing.






Next: Finding The Angle

Previous: The Mitred Joint



Add to del.icio.us Add to Reddit Add to Digg Add to Del.icio.us Add to Google Add to Twitter Add to Stumble Upon
Add to Informational Site Network
Report
Privacy
SHAREADD TO EBOOK


Viewed 1726